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live Healthy to 101+

http://www.your101ways.com Add YEARS to your LIFE & LIFE to your YEARS!
 

SEX at SIXTY!
You may have heard the old saying: “There may be snow on the roof but there’s still fire in the furnace.” It means age has little to with urge. And yet, all too often, men and women needlessly forgo the opportunity to enjoy a rich, satisfying, and active sex life as they get older.

Sexuality in Midlife and Beyond, a newly revised Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School, tells you everything you want and need to know about experiencing your sexual maturity to its fullest. It explains the techniques and practical steps you can take to find ongoing fulfillment in the physical and emotional pleasures that sex affords.

Indeed, midlife can be a springboard to renewed sexual expression and connection. Some women feel more relaxed about sex once their child-bearing days are past. The changes a man experiences can be an impetus for developing fresh and more expressive styles of lovemaking.

Sexuality in Midlife and Beyond describes the latest treatments for common sexual problems associated with aging. It provides guidance for bringing understanding, intimacy, and adventure back into a relationship. And it will show you how to keep sex an anticipated, natural, and gratifying experience for you and your partner.

Natural ways to reverse erectile dysfunction
the risks and benefits of hormone therapy for women and men
the truth about the G-spot (and how to find it)
medications for premature ejaculation
ways to treat vaginal dryness
tips for making sex more comfortable and pleasurable
the facts you might not know about sex therapy
and more!
The report candidly discusses the challenges older adults sometimes face. You’ll learn how aging affects the stages of sexual response and how illness, medications, and emotional issues can influence your sexual capabilities. And just as candidly, the report explores how you can improve your sexual fitness, rekindle your sexual energy, and add stimulating variety and spontaneity to your sexual activities.
www.academyofwellness.com ; www.your101ways.com

101 year old man who was getting ready to do his 10 marathon What? Can you say that again? I asked him.

He told me that years ago he discovered that when he ate a combination of broccoli, green tea extract and spirulina his energy levels dramatically increased.

My new found 101 year old friend finished the marathon in a respectable 5.5 hours and I hobbled across the line in just over 6.

After the race and the adrenalin died down I found myself thinking about the conversation I had with this guy at the start line.

How could it be possible that a simple combination of foods could give a 101 year old guy enough energy to run a marathon? The researchers found that when specific quantities of these foods are combined.

http://www.your101ways.com

The quest to live longer has been one of humanities oldest dreams, but while scientists have been searching, a few isolated communities have stumbled across the answer.
On the remote Japanese island of Okinawa, In the Californian town of Loma Linda and in the mountains of Sardinia people live longer than anywhere else on earth.
In these unique communities a group of scientists have dedicated their lives to trying to uncover their secrets.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there are about 500,000 centenarians in the world, and almost 100,000 in the United States. And the population is rapidly growing. The agency projects by 2050 there will be 1.1 million centenarians in America alone. Meanwhile, researchers at Boston University predict there will be even more, estimating some 3 million baby boomers will live to be 100 or older.

This begs the question: How can you live healthfully into your 100s? Experts say having good genes is half the battle, but lifestyle clearly contributes too. ForbesWoman asked current 100-year-olds to share their secrets for healthy living. Medical professionals insist that beginning these practices early can easily add decades to your lifetime–though it is never too late to start.
Wellness E-book

Many studies support the belief that having an upbeat and positive attitude will translate into living a longer, healthier life, and conversely, that a pessimistic outlook promotes ill health and can shave years off your life.

For example, in one study,1 the tendency to always expect the worst was linked to a 25 percent higher risk of dying before the age of 65.

Perhaps one of the most well-known forerunners of “the science of happiness” was Norman Cousins, who in 1964 was diagnosed with a life-threatening autoimmune disease.

After being given a 1 in 500 chance of recovery, Cousins created his own laughter therapy program, which he claims was the key to his ultimate recovery. He went on to write the book, “Anatomy of an Illness,” and established the Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology2 in Los Angeles, California.

Phytonutrient Spectrum Foods
RED
Foods
Apples
Beans (adzuki,
kidney, red)
Beets
Bell peppers
Blood oranges
Cranberries
Cherries
Grapefruit (pink)
Goji berries
Grapes
Onions
Plums
Pomegranate
Potatoes
Radicchio
Radishes
Raspberries
Strawberries
Sweet red peppers
Rhubarb
Rooibos tea
Tomato
Watermelon
Benefits
Anti-cancer
Anti-inflammatory
Cell protection
Gastrointestinal health
Heart health
Hormone health
Liver health
Foods
Apple
Asian pears
Banana
Bell peppers
Corn
Corn-on-the-cob
Ginger root
Lemon
Millet
Pineapple
Starfruit
Succotash
Summer squash
Benefits
Anti-cancer
Anti-inflammatory
Cell protection
Cognition
Eye health
Heart health
Skin health
Vascular health
YELLOW
Foods
Apples
Artichoke
Asparagus
Avocado
Bamboo sprouts
Bean sprouts
Bell peppers
Bitter melon
Bok choy
Broccoli
Broccolini
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Celery
Cucumbers
Edamame/Soy beans
Green beans
Green peas
Green tea
Greens (arugula, beet,
chard/swiss chard,
collard, dandelion,
kale, lettuce, mustard,
spinach, turnip)
Limes
Okra
Olives
Pears
Snow peas
Watercress
Zucchini
Benefits
Anti-cancer
Anti-inflammatory
Brain health
Cell protection
Skin health
Hormone balance
Heart health
Liver health
GREEN
Foods
Bell peppers
Berries (blue, black,
boysenberries,
huckleberries,
marionberries)
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Eggplant
Figs
Grapes
Kale
Olives
Plums
Potatoes
Prunes
Raisins
Rice (black
or purple)
Benefits
Anti-cancer
Anti-inflammator
Cell protection
Cognitive health
Heart health
Liver health
BLUE/PURPLE/BLACK
Foods
Apples
Applesauce
Bean dips
Cauliflower
Cocoa
Coconut
Coffee
Dates
Garlic
Ginger
Jicama
Legumes (chickpeas,
dried beans or peas,
hummus, lentils,
peanuts, refried beans/
low-fat)
Mushrooms
Nuts (almonds, cashews,
pecans, walnuts)
Onions
Pears
Sauerkraut
Seeds (flax, hemp,
pumpkin, sesame,
sunflower)
Shallots
Soy
Tahini
Tea (black, white)
Whole grains
(barley, brown, rice,
oat, quinoa, rye,
spelt, wheat)
Benefits
Anti-cancer
Anti-microbial
Cell protection
Gastrointestinal
health
Heart health
Hormone health
Liver health
WHITE/TAN/BROWN
Foods
Apricots
Bell peppers
Cantaloupe
Carrots
Mango
Nectarine
Orange
Papaya
Persimmons
Pumpkin
Squash (acorn,
buttercup, butternut,
winter)
Sweet potato
Tangerines
Tumeric root
Yams
Benefits
Anti-cancer
Anti-bacterial
Immune health
Cell protection
Reduced mortality
Reproductive health
Skin health
Source of vitamin A
ORANGE
Version 3 2015 The Institute for Functional Medicine
Food is more than nutrition. We believe its essential to have optimal amounts of these nutrients and to be
nourished through the power of yum, joy of cooking and eating, and the courage to be creative while increasing
control of our food supply and meal preparation.
6 STEPS TO GETTING MORE PHYTONUTRIENTS
Eat a Rainbow of Phytonutrients
1 Aim for 9-13 Servings of Plant Foods Everyday
We need about 9-13 servings of whole plant foods if we want to prevent chronic disease. A typical serving
is only half a cup of cooked vegetables, one cup of raw leafy vegetable, or a medium-sized piece of fruit. It
would be best to aim for every meal of the day to have about 3-4 servings of plant foods so that at three
general meals per day (not including snacks), you would make your serving requirement on a daily basis.
2 Know Your Phytonutrient Sources
Phytonutrient-rich eats are limitless, making it fun to experiment with new varieties and colors even within
one category of food. Here are some sources of phytonutrients to get you started: any and all plant foods,
including fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, and even herbs and spices.
3 Eat the Rainbow of Colors
Instead of getting the full rainbow of color, you may be eating the standard processed food colors of brown,
yellow, and white. For example, think of the typical breakfast menu waffles, pancakes, ready-to-eat cereal,
sausage, and eggs which does not necessarily provide much color early in the day. However, if you had a
fruit smoothie with blueberries, peaches, and raspberries, youd have three colors of the seven colors of the
rainbow first thing in the morning! Make it your goal to get the full seven colors every day with a variety
of foods.
4 Vary Your Choices
There are thousands of phytonutrients in nature. If we eat the same foods over and over again, even if they
are colorful, we may be missing the universe of important phytonutrients in foods. One helpful hint is to try
a new food every week to ensure that you are getting different foods to try!
5 Maximize Combinations
When we put certain foods together, we may achieve a better effect than if we just had the foods by
themselves. Sometimes, there can be a synergistic result from combining certain foods. For example,
putting turmeric with black pepper together with olive oil could enhance the phytonutrient effects of all
three foods on your health. Adding lemon juice to spinach could help the iron become more absorbed by
your body. Try putting plant foods together for an enhanced health benefit.
6 Be Creative with Substitutions
One way to get more plant foods would be to think of foods that are commonly eaten that may not
be as nutrient dense and replace with nutrient-dense options. Some plant foods clearly give us more
phytonutrients than others! For example, you could substitute mashed potatoes with mashed purple
potatoes or sweet potatoes. You could substitute white rice with purple, brown, or black rice.

ReNew Food Plan
FATS & OILS Fats
Servings/day______
Minimally re ned, cold pressed, organic,
non-GMO preferred
Avocado 2 T
or ⅛ whole
Coconut butter
(raw)1 t
Coconut milk,
regular (BPAfree
canned or
boxed)1 T
Ghee/clari ed
butter (grass-fed)1 t
Oils, cooking:
Avocado, coconut,
ghee/clari ed
butter, olive (extra
virgin), sesame1 t
Oils, salad: Almond,
avocado, axseed,
hempseed, olive
oil (extra virgin),
sesame, walnut1 t
Olives: Black,
green, kalamata8
Pesto (olive oil)1 t
1 serving = 45 calories, 5 g fat
PROTEINS Proteins
Servings/day______
Lean, free-range, grass-fed, organically grown
animal protein; non-GMO, organic plant protein;
and wild-caught, low-mercury  sh preferred.
Animal Protein:
Egg 1
Fish: Anchovies,
cod,  ounder/sole,
herring, halibut,
salmon, sardines,
trout, etc.1 oz
Meat: Beef, bu alo,
elk, lamb, venison,
ostrich, etc.1 oz
Poultry (skinless):
Chicken, Cornish
hen, duck, pheasant,
turkey, etc.1 oz
Plant Protein:
Black soybeans c
Edamame c
Hemp tofu1 oz
Mung bean/
Edamame pasta
oz
Natto 1 oz
Spirulina2 T
Tofu ( rm/extra
 rm) 1-2 oz
Tofu (soft/silken)
3 oz
Tempeh 1 oz
Protein Powder:
Check label for #
grams/scoop
(1 protein serving =
7g protein)
Bovine collagen,
egg, hemp, pea
1 serving as listed = 3575 calories, 57 g protein,
35 g fat, 04 g carbs
Average protein serving is 34 oz (size of palm of hand).
DAIRY ALTERNATIVES Proteins/Carbs
Servings/day______
Unsweetened, organic preferred
Yogurt: Coconut
(plain) 4-6 oz
Ke r: Coconut
(plain) 4-6 oz
Nut/seed milk:
Almond, cashew,
coconut,  axseed,
hazelnut, hemp8 oz
1 serving = 2590 calories, 19 g protein, 14 g carbs
(nutritional values vary)
NO DAIRY ALLOWED
NUTS & SEEDS Proteins/Fats
Servings/day______
Unsweetened, unsalted, organic preferred
Almonds6
Brazil nuts2
Cashews 6
Chia seeds1 T
Coconut (dried)3 T
Coconut wraps
(raw, vegan)1 wrap
Flaxseed (ground)
2 T
Hazelnuts5
Hemp seeds1
Macadamias2-3
Nut and seed
butters: Almond,
cashew, macadamia,
pecan, sun ower,
tahini, walnut T
Pecan halves4
Pine nuts1 T
Pistachios16
Pumpkin seeds1 T
Sesame seeds1 T
Sun ower seeds
1 T
Walnut halves 4




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